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Episode 28: David Hoke - Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health
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Episode 28: David Hoke - Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health

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Episode 28: David Hoke - Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health

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Episode 28: David Hoke - Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health

The significance of emotional connection in healthcare and the importance of creating a universal and humanistic approach to healthcare are just some of the topics covered by Seth Serxner and David Hoke, Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health, in the 28th episode of The Health Literacy 2.0 Podcast.

In this episode of The Health Literacy 2.0 Podcast, Seth Serxner is joined by David Hoke, Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health, the only nationwide virtual triage and physical therapy platform.

David brings over 25 years of expertise in corporate health and well-being, having spearheaded strategic health initiatives for Fortune 500 companies, including Walmart.

Focused on authentic engagement and documented outcomes for diverse populations globally, David is dedicated to enhancing the health of RightMove's clientele.David is a sought-after speaker on well-being, the future of work, and technology, and has sponsored successful start-ups in Fintech, mHealth, and value-based design. He holds a degree from Dickinson College and a Masters from New York University with an emphasis on kinesiology and therapeutic exercise.

In this episode, Seth and David dive deep into the pivotal role of health literacy in the context of workforce well-being. They discuss their experiences and insights, sharing thought-provoking ideas on how to create a humanistic view of health care, emphasizing that we are more alike than different and striving for a universal solution to the challenges of health literacy.

David sheds light on his new venture at Rightmove Health and his mission to address musculoskeletal health in a holistic and meaningful way. He shares compelling insights on creating emotional connections and using pain and discomfort as a powerful anchor to initiate habit formation and overall well-being. They also touch upon the importance of peer-to-peer influence and creating movements toward better health.

In a wide-ranging conversation, Seth and David discuss

🔹️ The importance of understanding that people's healthcare experiences are emotional rather than transactional.

🔹️ Creating more accessible and engaging health literacy resources for diverse audiences.

️🔹️ The importance of peer-to-peer influence and creating a sense of community in promoting better health.

️🔹️ Helping individuals make informed and emotionally resonant decisions about their health, especially during vulnerable moments.

🔹️️ The challenges of health literacy and the need for a more engaging approach.

🔹️ And much more

David is dedicated to enhancing the health of RightMove's clientele, as Head of Consumer Experience and Well-Being at RightMove Health, the only nationwide virtual triage and physical therapy platform. He is a sought-after speaker on well-being, the future of work, and technology, and has sponsored successful start-ups in Fintech, mHealth, and value-based design.

Thanks, David!


While you're there, check out these other episodes...

🔹️ How to Navigate the Complex Employee Well-Being Vendor Landscape - with Steven Noeldner from MercerWELL

🔹️ A New Way for Employers to Provide Mental Health Support for Employees - with Sushant Gupta from Meomind

🔹️️ Helping Your Business Leaders Align with the Organization's Purpose - with Andrew Bartlow from People Leader Accelerator

🔹️ Reimagining Employee Benefits & Transforming Challenges into Strategic Assets for the Modern Workplace - with Karen Mueller from HORAN

🔹️ Helping Employees & Underserved Populations Navigate Healthcare & Optimize Benefits - with Carole Mendoza from Voya Financial

🔹️ The Challenges of Attracting & Retaining Top Talent in the Healthcare Industry - with Alden Pennington

🔹️️ The Importance of Employee Engagement, Belonging, & Empowerment in Creating a Healthy, Thriving Workforce - with Karla Muniz, IMA Medical Group

🔹️ A Playbook for Emotional & Mental Health - with Stephanie Szostak and Dr. Trina Clayeux

🔹️️ An Innovative Approach to Supporting the Well-Being of 30,000 Employees - with Mel Goodrich from Sentara Health

🔹️ Addressing the Healthcare Challenges Faced by Self-Insured Employers - with Howard Kraft from XO Health Inc.

🔹️ Workplace Well-Being - with Jessica Grossmeier

🔹️ How to Use Integrated Data Analytics & Insights for Better Workplace Health - with Jennifer A Jones from Springbuk

Newsletters

Valentine's Day Survival Guide

Valentine’s Day can be tough when you’re single. It can make anyone feel left out and lonely. Why not use this February to nurture the relationships in your life that you care most about? That includes the one you have with yourself! Here are some tips to help you beat the blues and enjoy the day, with a friend or on your own.

he candlelight flickers. You glance up. Your Valentine is already looking at you with soft eyes. Soft light dances on their face and you smile. Holding hands across the table, caressing thumbs, neither of you says anything. The sounds of a crowded restaurant fade as you’re lost in each other’s gaze. 

Sigh ...

Maybe not this year.

Valentine’s Day can be tough when you’re single. Everywhereyou look, you see couples holding hands, sharing chocolates, sending flowers,whispering sweet nothings. It can make anyone feel left out and lonely.

Why not use this February to nurture the relationships in your life that you care most about? That includes the one you have with yourself! Here are some tips to help you beat the blues and enjoy the day, with a friend or on your own.

Embrace the independence

Being single on Valentine’s Day gives you the opportunity to do what you love and indulge in some much-needed self-care. Spend the day at a spa, go shopping, or treat yourself to dinner out. Remember, you don’t need someone else to make you happy.

Surround yourself with friends

If you don’t want to spend the day alone, gather a group of single friends and celebrate together. Plan a date, exchange gifts, cook, watch movies, and talk about how annoying Valentine’s Day is.

Get creative

If you’re feeling adventurous, try something new. Cook up an exotic new recipe. Go bungee jumping. Sign up for guitar lessons. Go horseback riding. Sing karaoke. Plan a solo adventure, like traveling to a new city or hiking a nearby trail. Attend a concert. Participate in a singles event or speed dating session. Doing something that takes you out of your comfort zone can be a great way to build confidence and fight loneliness. 

Volunteer 

Spending time helping others helps you feel fulfilled and connected to your community. Volunteer at a local charity, visit an elderly care home, or help out at a homeless shelter.

It’s more important than it sounds. Loneliness can hurt your health. Studies have shown that loneliness can lead to depression, anxiety, and even physical health problems like heart disease. That’s why it’s so important to build — and maintain — a strong community of friends and family.

Having a supportive network of people you can turn to for help and encouragement is essential for your well-being. Join a club, take up a sport, or just spend time with your neighbors — connection is everything.

Valentine’s Day is about honoring and tending to the supportive relationships in your life, whether they’re romantic or not. Embrace your independence, surround yourself with friends, get creative, and don’t forget the importance of community.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Log in now. Learn about other ways to stay healthy and add years to your life.

(This is an example of the weekly newsletters that go out to all users of The EdLogics Platform, a gamified space that improves employee engagement and health literacy. Contact us to learn how to get access for your organization.)

Newsletters

Valentine's Day Survival Guide

he candlelight flickers. You glance up. Your Valentine is already looking at you with soft eyes. Soft light dances on their face and you smile. Holding hands across the table, caressing thumbs, neither of you says anything. The sounds of a crowded restaurant fade as you’re lost in each other’s gaze. 

Sigh ...

Maybe not this year.

Valentine’s Day can be tough when you’re single. Everywhereyou look, you see couples holding hands, sharing chocolates, sending flowers,whispering sweet nothings. It can make anyone feel left out and lonely.

Why not use this February to nurture the relationships in your life that you care most about? That includes the one you have with yourself! Here are some tips to help you beat the blues and enjoy the day, with a friend or on your own.

Embrace the independence

Being single on Valentine’s Day gives you the opportunity to do what you love and indulge in some much-needed self-care. Spend the day at a spa, go shopping, or treat yourself to dinner out. Remember, you don’t need someone else to make you happy.

Surround yourself with friends

If you don’t want to spend the day alone, gather a group of single friends and celebrate together. Plan a date, exchange gifts, cook, watch movies, and talk about how annoying Valentine’s Day is.

Get creative

If you’re feeling adventurous, try something new. Cook up an exotic new recipe. Go bungee jumping. Sign up for guitar lessons. Go horseback riding. Sing karaoke. Plan a solo adventure, like traveling to a new city or hiking a nearby trail. Attend a concert. Participate in a singles event or speed dating session. Doing something that takes you out of your comfort zone can be a great way to build confidence and fight loneliness. 

Volunteer 

Spending time helping others helps you feel fulfilled and connected to your community. Volunteer at a local charity, visit an elderly care home, or help out at a homeless shelter.

It’s more important than it sounds. Loneliness can hurt your health. Studies have shown that loneliness can lead to depression, anxiety, and even physical health problems like heart disease. That’s why it’s so important to build — and maintain — a strong community of friends and family.

Having a supportive network of people you can turn to for help and encouragement is essential for your well-being. Join a club, take up a sport, or just spend time with your neighbors — connection is everything.

Valentine’s Day is about honoring and tending to the supportive relationships in your life, whether they’re romantic or not. Embrace your independence, surround yourself with friends, get creative, and don’t forget the importance of community.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Log in now. Learn about other ways to stay healthy and add years to your life.

(This is an example of the weekly newsletters that go out to all users of The EdLogics Platform, a gamified space that improves employee engagement and health literacy. Contact us to learn how to get access for your organization.)

Health Literacy

Win-Win: How Healthcare Gamification Helps Companies and Employees

In 2012, Tom Chamberlain, PharmD, founded EdLogics, our gamified health education platform. Recently he shared how he first got the idea from working with patients, and the results so far.

Let’s start with your background. You began your career as a pharmacist, right?

Right. As a PharmD and an entrepreneur, I’ve been involved in starting and growing a number of companies, all of them focused on healthcare education and improving the utilization of healthcare services. My primary objective has always been to improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare costs for consumers and payors of healthcare services.

And how did you get the idea for EdLogics?

I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to manage my own patients during my doctor of pharmacy program and residency training. Having firsthand experience treating patients with chronic conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, and COPD, I knew the challenges of educating and engaging patients in the self-management of their conditions. Traditional educational strategies such as pamphlets and printouts weren’t effective in teaching patients what they needed to know to improve their conditions.

For people with diabetes, testing blood sugar is a routine part of managing their condition. If you’re injecting insulin or using a pump, you may have to test several times a day. Without accurate blood sugar tests, you might not get the right amount of insulin at the right times.

If you can’t measure your blood sugar, you can’t control it. And if you can’t control your blood sugar, you raise your risk of amputations, heart attacks, blindness, erectile dysfunction, and many other problems. One immediate risk is diabetic ketoacidosis, which comes on quickly and can be fatal. Even if you survive, your ER trip will cost thousands of dollars. And it all can be avoided with appropriate education.

Many patients seem to understand how to check their blood sugar once someone shows them. But it was clear to me that most of my patients had forgotten what they’d learned by their next visit. They still weren’t retaining the information needed to manage their diabetes.

This happened over and over again – and similar scenarios occurred with a number of patients with various chronic conditions. I realized we’d never be able to help our patients if we couldn’t find a better way to teach them what to do.

Is that where health literacy comes in?

Yes, but a lot of people aren’t familiar with the term. Here’s one definition:

“Health literacy is the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.”

Or to put it more simply:

“Health literacy means you can find and understand the information you need to make good decisions about your health.”

Low health literacy is now recognized as a critical barrier to effective and efficient healthcare. It’s an enormous problem, and the consequences are far-reaching. For instance, did you know that compared to patients with adequate health literacy, patients with low health literacy have:

  • 40% higher risk of going to the emergency room
  • 55% higher risk of hospitalization from asthma
  • 3 times more heart failure hospitalizations
  • and 3 times greater odds of 30-day readmission for patients over age 64

In fact, the cost of low health literacy in the US is somewhere between $106 billion and $238 billion per year. It’s unreal!

If we want to improve health outcomes and lower healthcare costs, we need a way to reach consumers – a way that works for them long term.

So how does EdLogics help?

Since I started working in the healthcare industry, the concept of health literacy has matured into an academic discipline. Institutions like Vanderbilt University have devoted teams of talented experts and researchers—like Russell Rothman, MD, MPP, arguably one of the top health literacy experts in the world—to help healthcare providers, employers, payors, and the public understand the implications of low health literacy—and develop effective solutions to address this major healthcare issue.

At EdLogics, we’ve teamed up with many leading academic medical centers and Centers of Excellence (CoE), as well as industry thought leaders like Dr. Rothman and former US Secretary of Health and Human Services Governor Tommy Thompson, to identify specific ways to improve health literacy.

The first step is to make learning fun and engaging. To do this, we employ and work with experienced clinicians, developers, designers, and gamification experts to create stimulating, engaging games that educate users on important health topics, from diabetes to the Zika virus, all developed with the low health literate user in mind.

To keep users coming back, we’ve developed innovative gamification and unique incentive strategies where users earn rewards by playing games and completing educational activities.

Employers can purchase a customized version of the platform, enabling employees and their families to play, learn, and win. And the cost is minimal: roughly $20 a year per family.

What have you seen so far?

I’m very proud of our platform. It’s a product that educates consumers about chronic diseases, common medical conditions, general health, well-being, medications, and how to navigate the healthcare system. We’ve heard inspiring testimonials from employers and employees, and we have impressive statistics on knowledge improvement and consumer engagement. In fact, 100% of users improve their knowledge of a given condition after completing our learning activities, and 79% of users say they will change their behavior based on what they learned.

We’re continuously making enhancements, all with a focus on improving consumer engagement. That’s the key to being able to influence positive behavior change and deliver the most important, lifesaving knowledge. Not to mention the opportunity to reduce pain and suffering – both physical and financial.

A version of this article was originally published on2/22/2017.

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